A ED 813

A ED 813: Contemporary Art and Public Pedagogy

Inquiry into the public pedagogy of contemporary visual culture for relevancy to museum and K-12 art education contexts. (3 credits)

This course prepares art teachers to become producers of a socially just world by becoming critical public art pedagogues who extend their teaching environment. As defined in the course, critical public pedagogy of art, as an educational and artistic practice, is a critical stance concerning socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities.

Public pedagogy is the use of a public medium and/or space such as the Internet, films, television, magazines, shopping malls, and sports arenas to influence behaviors and beliefs. Public pedagogy enacts societal curricula that are easily consumed because of its ubiquitous nature. Awareness of consumption of public pedagogy is important because of its global reach. Educators need to be versed in how to facilitate investigations of public pedagogy and how to guide students to develop critical public pedagogical practices.

From spheres of influence radiating from art to a multidirectional layered matrix of sensibility, this course explores contemporary art that addresses and enacts public pedagogy through (inter)actions of cultural interfaces such as humans, technologies, localities, and politics. Such artworks are performed networks of relations. Contemporary artists’ praxis involving intertextuality, palimpsest, remix, code-switching, double-coding, subversion, and hypersignification is explored through video, installation, performance, and other contemporary art forms.

Objectives of the course include understanding processes of consumption and production of public pedagogy, and understanding contemporary art practices. By the end of the course, participants should be able to develop and implement units of instruction related to contemporary art and public pedagogy, and reflect on their own and others’ teaching practices in schools and museums.

This is one of the required courses for the M.P.S. in Art Education. It is offered every other spring semester with a maximum enrollment of 15 students.

Course Outline

  1. Public pedagogy (5 weeks)
  2. Contemporary art concepts (5 weeks)
  3. Performed networks of relations (2 weeks)
  4. Contemporary art and public pedagogy in schools and museums (4 weeks)

By the end of the course, participants in the course should:

  • understand contemporary art forms, processes, and strategies to investigate the public pedagogy of socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities
     
  • be able to construct units of instruction in which students (the participants’ students) apply contemporary art forms, processes, and strategies to investigate the public pedagogy of socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities
     
  • be able to reflect on the effectiveness of their own and others’ teaching practices in engaging students with issues of the public pedagogy of visual culture.

Evaluation Methods--Achievement of the objectives described above will be assessed through:

  • written responses to readings and images.
  • written responses to other participants’ analyses of readings and images.
  • Creation of an installation, performance, or video artwork that stimulates dialogue or another response of engagement with the work/artist. The intertextual interpretative work produces or transforms a situation.
  • written feedback on the contemporary art theories in the praxis of other participants’ artwork
  • units of instruction that are designed to engage students (i.e., the participants’ students) in contemporary art forms, processes, and strategies to investigate the public pedagogy of socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities
  • written reports about the implementation of these units of instruction in participants’ schools and museums, including reflections about the effectiveness and value of teaching the units.
  • written feedback on other participants’ reports and reflections.

Assignments will be weighted in proportion to the amount of time spent on major topics in the course. (See the outline of major topics above.) Participants’ units of instruction, reflections on their own teaching, and feedback on others’ pedagogical research—i.e., the final project, completed during the last 4 weeks—will be worth 25–30% of the final grade in the course.

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