Curriculum

Relevant Course Work

Penn State's 30-credit online MPS in art education curriculum focuses on professional advancement in the knowledge area of art educational theory and practice. Each course focuses on helping you to look at familiar teaching situations in new ways while meeting your professional development requirements.

Course topics include:

The MPS in art education is composed of 18 credits of core courses, an additional 6 credits of foundational courses at the 400 level or above (to be determined during a consultation with an art education adviser), and 6 elective credits chosen from a selection of Penn State online courses.

Students accepted into the program may begin their course work during any academic semester. The typical student course load is expected to be 3 to 4 courses per year. At the rate of four 3-credit courses per year, most students will complete the MPS in art education program in about 2 and a half years of part-time study.

Collaborative Experience, Practical Applications

The master's degree curriculum uses a blend of Web technology, print, and other media to maximize flexibility without sacrificing professor and student interaction. Communication tools, including bulletin boards and e-mail, are used to foster a collaborative environment, providing you with the opportunity to learn from one another. The curriculum and course format will help you develop practical applications of the topics you study. Learn online when it is convenient for you, and immediately apply what you've learned to your job.

MPS Overview

Master of Professional Studies in Art Education

The master of professional studies (MPS) in art education is an innovative online degree program that blends electronic and experiential learning. The curriculum for this 30-credit course of study offers art and museum education professionals new ways of looking at familiar teaching situations while advancing their careers.

A Penn State MPS in art education can help you:

*Persons interested in the NBPTS certification need to speak with the College of Arts and Architecture before registering for course work. This certification is granted by the NBPTS (not Penn State) and requires additional forms, fees, tests, and possible course work.

A Degree of Distinction

Since its founding in 1855, Penn State has established itself as one of the nation's most respected universities. Penn State is a pioneer in distance education, with a support system designed specifically for students who are not located on physical campuses.

All courses are accessible using any Internet connection, so you can study at times and locations that are convenient to your schedule. This allows you to complete your MPS in art education entirely online. Students who successfully finish the MPS program receive a Penn State diploma identical to those completing the degree on campus.

Learn alongside Other Art Educators

You'll interact with dedicated, goal-oriented peers, along with internationally recognized faculty members — the same faculty that teach on campus — in an atmosphere of high expectations and great cooperation. As you communicate daily with other art education professionals from around the globe, you'll gain insights that you can apply immediately to your job.

Curriculum

Relevant Course Work

Penn State's 30-credit online MPS in art education curriculum focuses on professional advancement in the knowledge area of art educational theory and practice. Each course focuses on helping you to look at familiar teaching situations in new ways while meeting your professional development requirements.

Course topics include:

The MPS in art education is composed of 18 credits of core courses, an additional 6 credits of foundational courses at the 400 level or above (to be determined during a consultation with an art education adviser), and 6 elective credits chosen from a selection of Penn State online courses.

Students accepted into the program may begin their course work during any academic semester. The typical student course load is expected to be 3 to 4 courses per year. At the rate of four 3-credit courses per year, most students will complete the MPS in art education program in about 2 and a half years of part-time study.

Collaborative Experience, Practical Applications

The master's degree curriculum uses a blend of Web technology, print, and other media to maximize flexibility without sacrificing professor and student interaction. Communication tools, including bulletin boards and e-mail, are used to foster a collaborative environment, providing you with the opportunity to learn from one another. The curriculum and course format will help you develop practical applications of the topics you study. Learn online when it is convenient for you, and immediately apply what you've learned to your job.

Course List

Required Core Courses (18 credits)
A ED 811 New Media and Pedagogy
An exploration of the relationships between new forms of communication technologies and beliefs about the nature of knowledge and the nature of art.
3 credits
A ED 812 Diversity, Visual Culture, and Pedagogy
Diversity matters in museum and K–12 art education contexts.
3 credits
A ED 813 Contemporary Art and Public Pedagogy
Inquiry into the public pedagogy of contemporary art and other forms of visual culture for relevancy to museum and K–12 art education contexts.
3 credits
A ED 814 Pedagogy of Informal Learning
Pedagogy and contexts for learning in museums and other cultural institutions.
3 credits
A ED 815 Action Research in Art/Museum Education
Develop a reflective process with the aim of improving strategies, practices, and knowledge of the environments within which you practice art education.
3 credits
A ED 594 Research Topics
Supervised student activities on research projects identified on an individual or small-group basis.
3 credits

The following courses are approved foundational courses for this program.

Foundational Courses (6 credits)*
C I 550 Overview of Contemporary School Curriculum
Current school programs and options and their impact on pupils; problems in introducing new content into the curriculum.

Prerequisite: 12 credits in education and psychology or teaching experience
3 credits
EDLDR 551 Curriculum Design: Theory and Practice
The analysis and use of the foundations that underlie models of curriculum design.
3 credits
EDLDR 560 Principles of Instructional Supervision
Social and institutional settings for instructional supervision; functions, activities, and practices of supervision; supervisory case studies.
3 credits
EDLDR 563 Designing Staff Development Programs
Designing, implementing, and evaluating effective staff development programs for personnel in educational settings.
3 credits
ADTED 460 Intro to Adult Education
History, methods, agencies, program areas, and problems of adult education in the United States.
3 credits
ADTED 498 Teaching Adults Responsibility
Virtues operating in particular teaching situations are examined. Also examined are opportunities and challenges enabling and constraining those virtues.
3 credits
*You must speak with an art education academic adviser before choosing your foundational courses.

The following courses are approved as 400-level or above electives for this program.

Elective Courses (6 credits)*
EDLDR 553 Issues in Curriculum
The course provides a broad overview of contemporary school-based issues that stem from or become associated with the school curriculum.
3 credits
C I/EDLDR 501 Teaching as Inquiry
In this course, students are expected to complete a sustained, systematic inquiry (typically empirical in nature).
3 credits
LL ED 502 Studies in Literature for Children
Study of various genres of children's literature from various critical perspectives; emphasis on role of literature in children's lives.
3 credits
ADTED 470 Introduction to Distance Education
An introduction to the history, philosophy, organizations, learning theories, and instructional procedures used in American and international distance education.
3 credits
EDTEC 440 Introduction to Computers for Educators
Use of personal computers, video, and other media in education; models use technologies that include video, audio, print, computer, and telephone.
3 credits
EDTEC 448 Using Internet in the Classroom
An introduction to methods and models of using the Internet effectively in the classroom.

Prerequisite: EDTEC 400 or demonstrated Internet awareness
3 credits
*You must speak with an art education academic adviser before choosing your elective courses.


A ED 811

The learning environment

A ED 811: New Media & Pedagogy, like the other MPS courses, will be conducted entirely on the World Wide Web. There are no set class meeting times, but you will be required to complete weekly assignments. Registered students in this course will need to navigate between several environments in the World Wide Web. These include:

  • This Web site (https://elearning.psu.edu/courses/aed811/) - The course materials in this site consist of 6 themes, each is launched from an "Exploration" page of text, graphics, activity overviews with relevant links. Activities prompt participants to explore selected Web sites, to download data and/or software, or other adventures. Registered students are also prompted to navigate to ANGEL to engage in discussions and to submit assignments.
  • ANGEL (http://angel.psu.edu), Penn State's course management system. In ANGEL, registered students consult course calendars, communicate with the facilitator and course participants, submit assignments, receive feedback from the facilitator and peers, check assignments scores and course grades. A link to ANGEL is in the Resources menu in the course site. In ANGEL, you will find a link back to this site under the Lessons tab.

There are several ways for course participants to engage in interactivity and generation of content with the A ED 811 course. You will find the following in the leftside menu:

  • Participant is the individual's working space for interim drafts to present/share, to invite specific people to review, and as a private space for idea generation and reflection, in which we use blogs with permissions set by individual students.
  • Collaboration is a space for working together in small groups with a common goal or project, in which we use wikis for collaborative authoring.
  • Community is a public gathering place for the whole class and beyond for full class presentation, exhibition, and discussion, in which we use Second Life and other public virtual learning communities.
  • Resources includes a brief description of the type of resource. Click on each and a page will open with several specific free and open source programs that could be used in the activities of this course. You can comment on the page regarding how you used it, or problems with using it. Additionally, course participants can add to the resources by bookmarking a site in Diigo and  "tagging" it. Tagging automatically uploads the link to the appropriate resource page.

Diigo Bookmarking  and tagging

  • Diigo allows for you to contribute content to the course with shared bookmarking and annotations, comments, and sticky notes on Web pages. The resource section of the course provides links to other social networking tools too.

Topics of study

There are 6 themes as indicated under "Explorations" in the left menu of the course, each involving 1 to 4 weeks. Learning activities will be in the form of background reading, explorations and creation with the links and resources provided, and focused discussions as replies to your work posted in ANGEL's discussion forums. By doing this, you will become familiar with the content of new media integration in art and art education. You will also participate in online discussions about how to teach this content at your teaching site. Following the first 5 thematic explorations, you will complete a capstone essay (Exploration theme 6) in which you will construct a speculative fiction of a teaching scenario based on the content of this course imagined in your future teaching site in 2020.

Exploration 1 - Notions of Education and Knowledge (3 weeks)

The main priorities in Exploration 1 are to learn more about you and your beliefs about teaching art, and to imagine possibilities of human-technology interfaces for creating and critiquing art.

Exploration 2 - Identity & Community: Collaborations & Sharing Perspectives (4 weeks)

In Exploration 2, you will select a social networking tool from the course's resource menu to share ideas or resources, or to do a collaborative mini-project. After this introduction to social networking uses in art education, you will create a self-representation online and discuss power relational networks of social, physical, technological, and discursive inscriptions or conditions that either privilege one human representation or material existence over others, or that empowers through empowerment of all.

Exploration 3 - New Media Art and Net Art Multivocal Critiques (2 weeks)

In this exploration we will learn about new media art created with the Internet as the primary medium (i.e., Net art) and strategies to critique interactive Net art.

Exploration 4  - Game Pedagogy: Cyberhouse  (2 weeks)

Our focus of Exploration 4 is free, downloadable authoring programs outside of a commercial economy, which enables the creation of interactive experiences without the need for specialized programming knowledge or database support to introduce your students to graphical programming as creative artmaking. We will also do some activities in CyberHouse, an art education online program for the critique of visual culture, that Dr. Karen Keifer-Boyd has developed as game pedagogy.

Exploration 5  - Critical and Creative Synthesizers: WebQuests (4 weeks)

Explorations 5, involves you creating a socially responsive visual culture WebQuest, which is an inquiry-oriented activity in which learners construct knowledge through interacting with, evaluating, and connecting diverse, and sometimes contradictory, resources on the Internet in order to form new insights that they share in a tangible form intended to make a difference in the world. WebQuests are wrapped around a doable and interesting task that is ideally what responsible citizens do to create a more just world. Your students, when they engage in the WebQuest that you create should be using higher level thinking, which includes synthesis, analysis, problem-solving, creativity, and judgment.





 

 

 


 

Course Assignments for A ED 811will rely upon a variety of strategies to assess and evaluate participants' learning, including:

  • Required participation in on-line discussion forums to provide opportunities for me to gauge your progress and ability to articulate key concepts. You will be assigned weekly readings linked in each exploration, and asked to discuss and debate the significance of these readings within the larger framework of the topic of the current exploration.
  • Activities and reflective write-ups that require you to create, experience, interpret for your teaching context, reflect, and share the knowledge and ideas that you are forming.
  • A capstone essay that will be used to evaluate your technological imagination applied to your future teaching.

You will learn much, network, and have support. The MPS can help you develop a portfolio for the NBTS, and A ED 811 can help you develop your art education program to meet the 2008 National Education Technology Standards (NETS), which are to:

 

1. Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity

2. Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments

3. Model Digital-Age Work and Learning

4. Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility

5. Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership

(For more specifics about each see: http://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/NETS/ForTeachers/2008Standards/NETS_T_Standards_Final.pdf)

 

It is helpful to protect the time allotted, secure further funding and policy in support of art education by showing school boards, administrators, and parents how you as an art educator and your art education program fulfill all 5 NETS.

 

Your k-12 students will benefit from the contemporary currency of art educators in the MPS in Art Education program whose teaching becomes inquiry-based, collaborative, and integral to the digital world of their students’ life-span.

 


Below is a specific example of an Exploration in A ED 811

 

Exploration 4. Cybergame Pedagogy (2 weeks)

Cybergame Pedagogy Introduction

Studies of computer games that children have created to teach younger children can inform educators concerning children’s perspectives on how they learn. Teachers who encourage student creation of computer educational games can tap into student interests and encourage students to learn by teaching others with their games. Inspired by artists who create computer games as art and from a review of studies on children creating computer games to teach children, I encourage art educators to provide opportunities for children to create computer games as art.

When is a Computer Game, an Artwork?

A broad philosophical and historical definition of games is that games involve mutually agreed upon rules. Twentieth-century philosopher, Ludwig Wittgenstein, took this position in defining language as a game. One entry in Wikipedia defines games as “a characteristic human activity, strongly determined by custom and the frequent subjects of folklore, have been the subject of anthropological investigations. Another entry states, “Many animals play; only humans confirmable have games.”

A computer game typically involves characters, environments, and options from which the player selects. There is a story or activities and choices the player makes, usually for specific goals. Typically, the goal in computer games is to defeat another player in racing, fighting, or some other contest. In fact, competition is often viewed as synonymous with games. The conflict situation in a game may involve conflict over a resource, power, or money. However, artists tend to challenge, subvert, or parody popular culture computer games.

The nature of art is rarely theorized according to its media, although people commonly define painting and sculptures as art, and “new media” references an elusive, ever-changing “media” as critical to defining its nature as art. Art critics since the 1980s have noted that the database has become the new artform. Philosopher James Carse’s (1986) concept of finite and infinite games is useful in looking at cyber-artists’ games built from databases. According to new-media theorist Lev Manovich (2001), new media databases “function as a new kind of mirror that reflects human activities” (p. 235). Databases are the form underlying computer games, and databases are central to the interactive concepts of artists’ game creations. Arthur Kroker (2003) asks in a blog on new media art, “Are data flesh?” The database may be more analogous to everything under the flesh—skeletal framework, operational muscle, and certainly the central nervous system. Computer source code writing, i.e., database creation, is a powerful way to challenge inscriptions of the cultural body. For example, Ka-Ping Yee launched a Web site on July 30, 2005, that reverses gender pronouns and other gendered terms on any Web site that one enters in the search engine, thus calling attention to socially constructed gendered perspectives in the English language. Regender.com produces high-speed revisionist texts of the New York Times, the Book of Genesis, and other worldview representations. Assumptions about gender roles are revealed in reading a regendered text.

New media art, especially new media activist art typical involves what is referred to as “reverse engineering,” that is the “decompiling and dissembling of redistributed code” (Kroker, 2003, ¶x). Reverse engineering extends Dadaist collage and other social critiques using assemblage artforms. In reverse engineering the source code or data is rearranged in a new database as critiques of institutions, governments, and newsmedia to reveal power structures that control cultural narratives or worldviews of a society that privilege some and oppress others.

Historically, artists have been fascinated with games. For Duchamp, chess was the perfect art form. Today, Mel Chin, Gabriel Orozco, Sophie Calle, and Net artists teams such as ActionTank, aux2mondes, and Playskins create games intended for players to emotionally experience issues, such as biotechnology. Artists are intrigued with Web-based games as an artform partly because players experience a transformation in playing the game, and thus the power of art is highly effective in such work. Making a computer game is an interdisciplinary enterprise, often best achieved through collaboration.

KNOWMAD, a creative team of artists, includes Rocco Basile, Emil Busse, Mel Chin, Tom Hambleton, Brett Hawkins, Andrew Lunstad, Jane Powers, and Chris Taylor. Their installation KNOWMAD/MAP: Motion + Action = Place (2000) incorporates a physical space of a temporary home in the form of a tent and a virtual simulation of travel. In navigating the pseudo-arcade game, one’s journey is an exploration of the changing cultural meanings of carpet designs found in Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, the Caucasus, and Central Asia. The symbolic meanings transgress fixed national identity and geographical origin, and change according to context and social use. Thus, the game/art perpetually displaces a fixed form of knowledge and communicates that meanings change according to context.

Natalie Bookchin describes her cyberactivist goals in her co-created Web game MetaPet in the following excerpts from an interview with Mia Makela:

I wanted to set up the conditions to lure people away from their duties and make it convenient for them to play at work. The Situationists and their interventions into daily life as well as their slogans against work and for play have not escaped my game design methods.

The Metapet is more of an active agent that one may initially recognize. Players’ positions in the game are also instable. Winning and losing, the “goals of the game”, and the satisfaction attached to each scenario are not as linear or clear-cut as one might assume. Winning may be a rather dull scenario, and it may be more rewarding to subvert the system. (Makela 2003, ¶ 7 & 9)

The Progressive Dinner Party, inspired from pioneering feminist artist Judy Chicago’s art installation, The Dinner Party (1975-79), is an assemblage of feminist hypertextual literature on the Web (Guertin and Luesebrink 2000). In hypertexts, a term and concept introduced by Theodor Nelson in 1965, the reader creates her own pathways through the text; and as poststructual feminist Wendy Morgan posits, the author does not control the viewpoint or authority of the text (2000). In game studies, The Progressive Dinner Party, would be placed in the Interactive Fiction sub-genre, and viewed as text adventures. Photographer, Esther Parada’s (2002, 1996) constructive hypertext, such as “Transplant: A Tale of Three Continents,” has an interactive fiction game structure through archival photos and real life stories formed by the players’ choices.

Implications for Art Education in the 21st Century

I conclude with a list of what I propose are important areas in art education in the 21st century. Of course, this is not an exclusive list—but addresses some areas of study and experience that are relevant art education.

1.    computer games, like museums, present and interpret culture
2.    collaborative artmaking experiences
3.    interdisciplinary studies
4.    familiarity with learning theories
5.    explorations of simulations and games as constructivist story creation
6.    knowledge of inclusive and infinite game design
7.    experience in working with databases as an artform
8.    consideration of human-technology interfaces
9.   historical roots of computer games as art based in conceptual art, Dadaist collage, assemblage (reverse engineering), Situationist constructivist story, activist art, museumism art, contemporary issues, and popular culture.

References:
Carse, J. (1986). Finite and infinite games. New York: Free Press.

Guertin, C., & Luesebrink, M. C. (2000). The Progressive Dinner Party. Retrieved March 15, 2009, from http://www.heelstone.com/meridian/templates/Dinner/dinner1.htm
KNOWMAD Confederacy (2000). KNOWMAD/MAP: Motion + Action = Place. Retrieved January 15, 2009, from http://listart.mit.edu/node/285
Makela, M. (2003). METAPET – Genetic Code in the Service of the Brave New Corporate World: An Interview with Natalie Bookchin. Intelligent Agent, 3(2). Retrieved March 1, 2009, from http://www.intelligentagent.com/archive/Vol3_No2_gaming_bookchin.html
Manovich. L. (2001). The language of new media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Morgan, W. (2000). Electronic Tools for Dismantling the Master’s House: Poststructuralist Feminist Research and Hypertext Products. In W. S. Pillows & E. A. St.Pierre (Eds.), Working the Ruins: Feminist Poststructural Theory and Methods in Education (pp. 130–147). New York: Routledge.
Parada, E. (2002). When the bough breaks: Loss of tradition in the urban landscape. Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, 22:72–91.

Yee, Ka-Ping. (2005). Regender. Retrieved 1 March 2009, from http://regender.com

WEEK ONE (March 23-30):

Cybergame Pedagogy background audio and written texts. Select one or more from 6 text options below as background reading.

1. Jenkins, H. (2007). From YouTube to YouNiversity: Learning and playing in an age of participatory culture. International Journal of Communication, 1, 145-146. (1:19 minute audio lecture)
2. Fromme, J. (2003). Computer Games as Part of Children's Culture

3. Keifer-Boyd, K. (2005). Children teaching children with their computer game creations. Visual Arts Research, 60(1), 117-128.
4. Select an article from the MacArthur 2008 series on digital learning (all the articles are freely accessible at http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/browse/browse.asp?btype=6&serid=170).
5. Go to http://www.gamesforchange.org/play and play a game from the list. Keep these games in mind as you read Wasik, B. (2006). Grand Theft education: Literacy in the age of video games. Harper's Magazine, September, 31-39. Consider how these games that you just played support or refute the positions taken in the article.
6. See http://www.archimuse.com/mw2009/speakers/ for articles on Museums and the Web 2009, particularly these 3 papers:
  • Learning In The Wild: What Wolfquest Taught Developers and Game Players
  • Fictional press releases and fake artifacts: How the Smithsonian American Art Museum is letting game players redefine the rules
  • City Treasure. Mobile Games for Learning Cultural Heritage

WEEK TWO (March 30-April 6):

Explore free, downloadable authoring programs outside of a commercial economy such as Korsakow System, which enables the creation of interactive experiences without the need for specialized programming knowledge or database support; and Scratch, developed at MIT Media Lab to introduce children to graphical programming. Here are two open source or free game creating software programs: SQUEAK, GameMaker. Others that could be used include: Alice, Ethos, Flash, StageCast, StarLogo, and MicroWorlds.

Explore cybergame pedagogy in CyberHouse, an art education online program for the critique of visual culture that I am developing. CyberHouse players explore perception, production, and dissemination of images as cultural practices in terms of inclusion and exclusion from power and privilege. Like the air we breathe, we are immersed in visual culture and, therefore, are usually not aware of how power and privilege operate in works of art and other forms of visual culture from past and present times. CyberHouse is designed to expose ideologies of power conveyed by images, to help youth and adults examine privileged as well as neglected perspectives expressed or silenced through visual culture, and to participate in self-representation with their own visual creations and the choices they make in their interactions in CyberHouse.

After checking out readings on digital game play as education, and ways to create games as art education, develop a lesson plan for your teaching site that involves cybergame pedagogy. You are experienced teachers and know that lessons need a motivational hook and the purpose needs to be clear to students. The form of this lesson can be in narrative form, or traditional lesson plan form, or a lesson form you find useful (or is required) in your teaching site, or the form can even be a more visual and creative presentation of the lesson idea such as in a comic strip format. Post your lesson plan in ANGEL at the forum folder titled, "Cybergame Pedagogy."

 

A ED 812

A ED 812: Diversity, Visual Culture, and Pedagogy
Dr. Patricia Amburgy, Associate Professor of Art Education
pma5@psu.edu


This course examines diversity, visual culture, and pedagogy in various settings: the artworld, popular media, and cultural settings such as schools and museums. Diversity pertains to gender, sexual identity, social class, ethnicity, ability, age, and other attributes that shape our identities. This course pays special attention to issues of power and privilege in relation to diversity and visual culture. It examines ways that various forms of visual culture, situated in various social contexts, teach us who we are, what is "normal" in our society, and how we might change oppressive social conditions that currently exist. As defined in the course, visual culture includes paintings, sculptures, prints, and other forms of fine art as well as advertisements, news images, scientific images, television programs, and films. It includes toys, comic books, children's art-and more. Visual culture includes all manifestations of cultural life that are significant for their visual features. Pedagogy refers not only to formal methods of instruction, such as teaching and learning in classrooms. It also includes informal instruction through the arts, the media, popular forms of entertainment, and other social practices. Pedagogy includes being positioned by, or addressed in certain ways by various forms of visual culture. It includes the ways we actively interpret, use, and recreate forms of visual culture in our lives.

Objectives of the course include understanding diversity as defined in relation to various forms of visual culture; understanding the complex interactions of ethnicity, class, gender, sexual identity, and other aspects of diversity in visual culture; understanding issues of power and privilege in relation to visual culture; and understanding pedagogical issues related to visual culture, including forms of address and interpretation, as well as pedagogical practices such as teaching and learning in classrooms. By the end of the course, participants should be able to critically examine social constructions of race, class, gender, sexual identity, and other aspects of diversity in visual culture through both written and visual analyses. Participants should also be able to develop and implement units of instruction related to visual culture, and reflect on their own and others' teaching practices in schools and museums.

This is one of the required courses for the M.P.S. in Art Education. It is offered every other year with a maximum enrollment of 15 students.

Course Outline
1. Identity and community (2 weeks)
2. Dominant and disruptive representations in visual culture (5 weeks)
3. Visual culture as public pedagogy (4 weeks)
4. Diversity, visual culture, and pedagogy in schools and museums (4 weeks)

Major topics to be covered with an approximate length of time allotted for their discussion

1. Identity and community (2 weeks)
Introduction: Various aspects of our identities: age, religion, gender & sexual identity, geography, family, class/economic identity, political identity, recreation, race/ethnicity, occupation, health & body (1 week).
Dominant/stereotypical representations versus disruptive representations of identity communities; representations, power, and social privilege (1 week).

2. Dominant and disruptive representations in visual culture (5 weeks)
Representations of gender and sexual identity in visual culture (2 weeks)
Representations of race and ethnicity in visual culture (2 weeks)
Representations of class in visual culture (1 week)

3. Visual culture as public pedagogy (4 weeks)
Representation, forms of address, and making meaning (1 week)
Gazing at “others” and the exotic (1 week)
Watching movies, playing video games (1 week)
Consumerism (1 week)

4. Diversity, visual culture, and pedagogy in schools and museums (4 weeks)
Final research projects: course participants develop, implement, present, and reflect upon units of instruction related to visual culture (4 weeks)

A ED 813

A ED 813: Contemporary Art and Public Pedagogy

Inquiry into the public pedagogy of contemporary visual culture for relevancy to museum and K-12 art education contexts. (3 credits)

This course prepares art teachers to become producers of a socially just world by becoming critical public art pedagogues who extend their teaching environment. As defined in the course, critical public pedagogy of art, as an educational and artistic practice, is a critical stance concerning socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities.

Public pedagogy is the use of a public medium and/or space such as the Internet, films, television, magazines, shopping malls, and sports arenas to influence behaviors and beliefs. Public pedagogy enacts societal curricula that are easily consumed because of its ubiquitous nature. Awareness of consumption of public pedagogy is important because of its global reach. Educators need to be versed in how to facilitate investigations of public pedagogy and how to guide students to develop critical public pedagogical practices.

From spheres of influence radiating from art to a multidirectional layered matrix of sensibility, this course explores contemporary art that addresses and enacts public pedagogy through (inter)actions of cultural interfaces such as humans, technologies, localities, and politics. Such artworks are performed networks of relations. Contemporary artists’ praxis involving intertextuality, palimpsest, remix, code-switching, double-coding, subversion, and hypersignification is explored through video, installation, performance, and other contemporary art forms.

Objectives of the course include understanding processes of consumption and production of public pedagogy, and understanding contemporary art practices. By the end of the course, participants should be able to develop and implement units of instruction related to contemporary art and public pedagogy, and reflect on their own and others’ teaching practices in schools and museums.

This is one of the required courses for the M.P.S. in Art Education. It is offered every other spring semester with a maximum enrollment of 15 students.

Course Outline

  1. Public pedagogy (5 weeks)
  2. Contemporary art concepts (5 weeks)
  3. Performed networks of relations (2 weeks)
  4. Contemporary art and public pedagogy in schools and museums (4 weeks)

By the end of the course, participants in the course should:

  • understand contemporary art forms, processes, and strategies to investigate the public pedagogy of socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities
     
  • be able to construct units of instruction in which students (the participants’ students) apply contemporary art forms, processes, and strategies to investigate the public pedagogy of socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities
     
  • be able to reflect on the effectiveness of their own and others’ teaching practices in engaging students with issues of the public pedagogy of visual culture.

Evaluation Methods--Achievement of the objectives described above will be assessed through:

  • written responses to readings and images.
  • written responses to other participants’ analyses of readings and images.
  • Creation of an installation, performance, or video artwork that stimulates dialogue or another response of engagement with the work/artist. The intertextual interpretative work produces or transforms a situation.
  • written feedback on the contemporary art theories in the praxis of other participants’ artwork
  • units of instruction that are designed to engage students (i.e., the participants’ students) in contemporary art forms, processes, and strategies to investigate the public pedagogy of socio-pervasive artifacts, processes, and interfaces that acculturate and assimilate values, beliefs, and sensitivities
  • written reports about the implementation of these units of instruction in participants’ schools and museums, including reflections about the effectiveness and value of teaching the units.
  • written feedback on other participants’ reports and reflections.

Assignments will be weighted in proportion to the amount of time spent on major topics in the course. (See the outline of major topics above.) Participants’ units of instruction, reflections on their own teaching, and feedback on others’ pedagogical research—i.e., the final project, completed during the last 4 weeks—will be worth 25–30% of the final grade in the course.

A ED 814

A ED 815

Costs

Tuition and Other Costs

To see specific tuition and other cost information, please see the tuition and fees table.

There are many payment options available for Penn State students. Visit the paying for your education section for information about financial aid, scholarship opportunities, and other payment options.

Payment Options

There are several payment options available to you:

  1. Personal Payment: There are many options for payment including a deferred payment plan. Please see paying for your education for more information.
  2. Payment Plan: The Office of the Bursar's Web site has a complete listing of payment plan options available.
  3. Authorization to Bill Employer: If your employer has a program or budget for employee education, you may be able to pay for your education this way. To do so, a formal, written authorization to bill your employer must be submitted prior to registration. Your employer must then pay your tuition bill within 60 days.
  4. Financial Aid: There are many grants, loans, and scholarships available to students pursuing higher education. To learn more about which options might be available to you, visit our financial aid page.
  5. Military Options: A wide variety of educational funding programs is offered by the U.S. armed forces. To discuss which programs are suitable for your specific situation, contact Penn State's Office of Veterans Programs.

For detailed information about how to pay for your online courses, contact Student Services.

The Value of a Penn State Education

Gain a Nationally Recognized Education

According to a Gallup poll, Penn State has been ranked as the 11th best college or university in the United States. In the eastern United States, Penn State ranked 4th, behind Harvard, Yale, and Princeton.

This means your education will be easily recognized and held in high regard anywhere in the nation.

Connect with Your Peers

You will interact with dedicated, goal-oriented learners, creating an atmosphere of high expectations and great cooperation and allowing you to build a network of contacts in your field. You'll also gain insights that you can apply to your job immediately as you communicate daily with your instructor and other students.

Experience That Counts

Penn State has more than 100 years of distance education experience in catering to the needs of adult students. Our support systems are designed for students who are geographically removed from campus, and our offerings have always received high satisfaction ratings in terms of course content and student services.

Support at Your Fingertips

Since many adult students must balance work and study, we provide extended hours for the support services you need, and you do not have to set foot on campus. Student advising and help with course scheduling and registration are available from World Campus Student Services. World Campus HelpDesk personnel are available to give you technical support when you need it most.

Convenient Access to Library Resources

You will be able to access one of the leading university research libraries in North America — Penn State's University Libraries system, which holds nearly 5 million volumes and more than 58,000 serial subscriptions. You can easily search the online catalog and review the databases of any library in the Penn State system.

Admissions

If you have questions about the admissions process, contact Karen Keifer-Boyd, Lead Faculty, MPS Program

Prerequisites

For admission to the Graduate School, an applicant must hold either (1) a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or (2) a tertiary (postsecondary) degree that is deemed comparable to a four-year bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. This degree must be from an officially recognized degree-granting institution in the country in which it operates.

Application Materials

Karen Keifer-Boyd
Lead Faculty, MPS Program
School of Visual Arts
The Pennsylvania State University
210 Arts Cottage
University Park PA 16802
Phone: 814-865-6570
Email: kk-b@psu.edu

How to Apply

  1. Read the admissions requirements.
  2. Begin the graduate school application.
    1. On the "Admissions and Program Information Portal" page, choose "Apply Now."
    2. When you get to the "Campus, Major, Degree & Semester" page:
      1. Choose "WORLD CAMPUS" as the campus.
      2. Choose "ART EDUCATION" as the major.
      3. Choose "M P S" as the degree.

Technical Requirements

Our courses are designed to use technology in a way that enriches the learning experience and helps students communicate and collaborate with faculty and classmates in a productive and convenient way. Technology is an important cornerstone of this program; therefore, we provide "live" support from HelpDesk support staff through real-time chat. Please view the technical requirements for this program.

How to Take Online Art Education Graduate Courses Prior to Applying for the MPS Degree

You may be interested in earning credits while you apply for program admission. As a "nondegree" graduate, you may take courses in the program as you gather the application materials required for program admission. You may take up to 15 credits in nondegree status before submitting your application portfolio. For first time enrollment in a MPS course call (800) 252-3592 and ask to register for a particular course listed at http://schedule.psu.edu/act_search.cfm  If you decide to apply to the MPS, and if accepted into the MPS, the course can be transferred into the MPS in serving degree requirements.

Getting Started

After reading through the admissions requirements above, start the application process.

Faculty

 

One of the primary reasons Penn State is recognized around the globe as a distinguished university is the sterling caliber of its faculty. As a World Campus student, you will enjoy the opportunity to learn from the same instructors who teach traditional face-to-face classes on Penn State's twenty-four campuses across Pennsylvania. In addition, there is a provision in the MPS program for directed research, collaboration, and in-depth consultation by students with members of the art education faculty.

The MPS in art education is designed and taught by some of the finest art education instructors in the United States.

Patricia Amburgy, Ph.D.

Dr. Patricia M. Amburgy is an associate professor of art education. Her research interests include aesthetics, visual culture, and the history of art education. She has published articles and reviews in Art Education, Studies in Art Education, The Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, History of Education Quarterly, and other professional journals. She has written chapters on the history of art education and historical research for the Handbook of Research and Policy in Art Education (2004), Women Art Educators V: Conversations Across Time (2003), and Framing the Past: Essays on Art Education (1990). She co-edited a book on the foundations of education, Readings in American Public Schooling (1980), and a conference proceedings on the history of art education, The History of Art Education: Proceedings from the Second Penn State Conference, 1989 (1992).

Dr. Amburgy has given numerous presentations on the history and philosophy of art education at state, national, and international conferences, including meetings of the Pennsylvania Art Education Association (PAEA), the National Art Education Association (NAEA), the History of Education Society, and the International Society of Education through Art. She was associate editor of The Pennsylvania Art Educator, a journal of PAEA, from 1989 to 1994.

B. Stephen Carpenter, II, Ph.D.

B. Stephen Carpenter, II is professor of art education. He is author/co-author of numerous scholarly articles that have appeared in journals such as Art Education, Ceramics: Art and Perception, Computers in the Schools, Educational Leadership, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of Cultural Research in Art Education, The Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, The Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, The Journal of Visual Literacy, Studies in Art Education, and Visual Arts Research. He has also authored/co-authored numerous book chapters in art education, visual culture, and curriculum theory. In addition, he is co-author of Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching Art in High School (2006), and co-editor of Curriculum for a Progressive, Provocative, Poetic, and Public Pedagogy (2006). His mixed media installations and performance artworks have been exhibited in regional, national, and international exhibitions. Carpenter was editor of Art Education, the journal of the National Art Education Association (2004-2006) and is co-editor of the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy (2010-). His funded projects include the Texas Governor’s School in Arts and Humanities for Urban Leadership; the Ensemble Computing Portal; the TAMU Water Project; and, the Glasscock Island Digital Humanities and Visual Culture Education and Research Island in Second Life Project. Dr. Carpenter holds an M.F.A. degree in Visual Art from Slippery Rock University and M.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees in Art Education from Penn State University and has held faculty positions at Texas A&M University (2005-2010), Virginia Commonwealth University (2002-2004), and Old Dominion University (1995-2001).

Charles Garoian, Ph.D.

Dr. Charles R. Garoian, professor of art education, teaches performance art practice and performance-based art education courses. He has performed and lectured in colleges and universities, galleries and museums nationally and internationally, and received significant awards for his research and creative accomplishments. In 1996, he organized "Performance Art, Culture, Pedagogy," a national symposium held at Penn State, and in 2000, with colleague Yvonne Gaudelius organized "Performative Sites: Intersecting Art, Technology, and the Body," an international symposium that examined the pedagogical implications of performance artists' works.

Dr. Garoian's scholarly articles have been featured in a number of theoretical journals on art and education, and he has served as an independent reviewer and on the editorial review boards of several journals including the International Journal of Education and Art (IJEA), Studies in Art Education, and the Journal of Social Research in Art Education. Garoian is author of Performing Pedagogy: Toward an Art of Politics (1999), and co-author with Gaudelius of Spectacle Pedagogy: Art, Politics, and Visual Culture (2008).

Karen Keifer-Boyd, Ph.D.

Dr. Karen Keifer-Boyd, professor of art education, affiliate professor of women's studies at Penn State, and lead faculty in the MPS program, is an invited member of the Chi chapter of Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars in recognition of leadership in the area of technology and art education. She is co-author of InCITE, InSIGHT, InSITE (2007) and Engaging Visual Culture (2007), and co-editor of Real-World Readings in Art Education: Things Your Professors Never Told You (2000). Currently, she is co-authoring Including Difference: A Communitarian Approach in Art Education to the “Least Restrictive Environment” Law to be published in 2011 from NAEA. She also served as editor of The Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, as guest editor for Visual Arts Research, and is co-editor of Visual Culture and Gender.

D. Keifer-Boyd's research on feminist pedagogy, visual culture, cyberNet activism art pedagogy, action research, inclusion, and identity speculative fiction has been published in more than forty-five peer-reviewed research publications and translated into several languages. She has presented at more than fifty international and national conferences, and at several universities in South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Austria, and Finland. She has been honored with leadership and teaching awards, including a 2006 Fulbright Lecture and Research Award in Finland at the University of Art and Design from the Council for International Exchange of Scholars, and a 2009 Fulbright teaching position at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt in Gender Studies. Dr. Keifer-Boyd received the Arts Administrator of the Year National Art Education Award for the Pacific Region in 1994, the Texas Outstanding Art Educator in Higher Education Award in 2001, and the NAEA Women's Caucus Kathy Connors Teaching Award in 2005. She is president-elect of the National Art Education Women's Caucus (NAEA WC), and will serve as NAEA WC president from 2010 until 2012.

Wanda B. Knight, Ph.D.

Dr. Wanda Knight is associate professor of art education. She has taught all grade levels of the K–12 spectrum in various regions of the United States, including rural, suburban, and urban communities, as well as overseas, and served as registrar and assistant curator at the Albany Museum of Art in Albany, Georgia. As a former principal and recipient of an Annenberg Transforming Education Through the Arts Challenge Grant — used to implement an arts-focused curriculum — Dr. Knight led various educational public school initiatives designed to provide fair, ethical, and inclusive learning environments that foster creative and critical thinking.

Her teaching, academic, and research explorations in visual culture, cultural studies, and pedagogies of difference (i.e. class, gender, race, ability) mirror her pragmatic experience and quest for equity and social justice. Dr. Knight is president-elect of the United States Society for Education in the Arts (USSEA) and a past chair of NAEA's Committee on Multi-Ethnic Concerns. Dr. Knight also serves on the editorial review boards of The Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, Visual Culture and Gender, and The Journal of Multicultural and Cross Cultural Research in Art Education. She has also served as editor of The Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, published manuscripts, book chapters, and reviews in leading scholarly journals, and presented numerous papers at local, state, national, and international conferences. Dr. Knight's achievements in art/education have been recognized through various awards including the Eugene Grigsby Award for outstanding contribution to the field of art education, the Kenneth Marantz Distinguished Alumni Award from The Ohio State University, and Who's Who in American Education.

Mary Ann Stankiewicz, Ph.D.

Mary Ann Stankiewicz, president of the NAEA from 2003 to 2005, is internationally recognized for her scholarship in art education history. Her book, Roots of Art Education Practice, a history of art education for K–12 art teachers, was published in 2001. Her research on art education history and policy has been published in major professional journals, including Arts Education Policy Review, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, Art Education, Studies in Art Education, Visual Arts Research, and the International Journal of Art and Design Education. Her work has been included in many books, among them The Early Years of Art History in the United States; Histories of Art and Design Education: Cole to Coldstream; Art in a Democracy; Women, Art, and Education; In Their Own Words: The Development of Doctoral Study in Art Education; Contemporary Issues in Art Education; and Women Art Educators V. She co-authored the chapter on nineteenth-century art education for the Handbook of Research and Policy in Art Education (2004). She co-edited Women Art Educators I and Women Art Educators II with Enid Zimmerman of Indiana University and Framing the Past: Essays on Art Education, an international collection of papers published by the NAEA on the history of art education in Canada, Great Britain, and the United States, with Don Soucy.

Dr. Stankiewicz has received research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Spencer Foundation, and the Oregon Humanities Center at the University of Oregon, among other organizations. She was editor of Art Education, the journal of the National Art Education Association, from 1996 to 1998. A past president of NAEA's Women's Caucus, Dr. Stankiewicz has presented many papers and workshops at local, state, national, and international conferences. In 2003, she received the June King McFee Award from the NAEA Women's Caucus.

Graeme Sullivan, Ph.D.

Graeme Sullivan is director of the Penn State School of Visual Arts and professor of art education. His particular scholarly interest involves exploring the critical-reflexive thinking and forming processes of inquiry used in visual arts so as to enhance the importance of studio-based research in universities and art schools. He has described his ideas in his book Art Practice as Research: Inquiry in the Visual Arts (2005), which underwent a major update and revision in a new edition published in 2010 as featured on the Art Practice as Research website.  

Dr. Sullivan received the 1990 Manuel Barkan Memorial Award from the National Art Education Association for scholarly writing and was the recipient of the 2007 Lowenfeld Award for significant contribution to the field of art education. He is also the author of Seeing Australia: Views of Artists and Artwriters (1994). His record of professional service includes editor positions with Studies in Art Education and Australian Art Education, and as editorial board member and consultant to the International Journal of Art & Design Education (UK), International Journal of Education and the Arts, and Studies in Material Thinking. He maintains an active art practice and his Streetworks have been installed in several international cities and sites over the past fifteen years.

Technology

Before you begin working through the course content in the "Explorations" area, you need to make sure the computer you are using is configured properly for the multimedia that you will encounter. To do so refer to the first 4 links under "Resources" in the lefthand menu. These are: "Computer System," "Internet Connection," "Browser Options." and "Plugins."

Below are specifications and tests to help make sure everything is in working order.

Flash movies and Quicktime video

We have Flash movies and Quicktime video material in many of the explorations in this course. Chances are pretty good that you already use a Web browser that is configured to open up a Quicktime movie and play swf (Flash) files, but to be safe, here are some "test" files that you should try out now to make sure you won't have problems later in the course. If these files run smoothly for you, then you're ready to go. If you can't get one or any of the files below to play on your computer, then please refer to the steps at the bottom of this page to troubleshoot your problem.

 

 

This text will be replaced

Having trouble? Troubleshooting tips...

Computer System

Operating System
Windows 2000/XP or Vista, Mac OS X 10.2 or higher (10.3 or higher recommended)

Processor
1 GHz or higher

Memory
256 MB of RAM

Hard Drive Space
500 MB free disk space

Internet Connection

A broadband (cable or DSL) connection is required.

Browser Options

Recommended Browsers

Firefox and Safari are preferred as they will provide the fastest
experience possible for students.

Mac OS X: Firefox, Safari (current version)
Windows: Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer (current version)

Notes

Cookies, Java, and JavaScript must be enabled.
Pop-up blockers should be configured to permit new windows
from Penn State Web sites.

Due to nonstandard handling of CSS, JavaScript and caching,
we do not support using Internet Explorer 6 as your browser.

Plugins

Adobe Reader [Download from Adobe]
Flash Player [Download from Adobe]

Image Creation

Under each resource, make a comment.  Comments regarding possible uses in art education, problems encountered, or offer solutions and tips will be helpful to others. Also, feel free to bookmark additional resources that you find.  Bookmarks that are tagged in Diigo with image_creation will automatically be viewable to others on this page.

Animation

Course participants can tag more animation resources in Diigo, and here use the comment link below to add comments about the animation resource regarding uses in art education, problems encountered, or offer solutions and tips.

Social Networking

Try these social networking sites incorporated into your art teaching practice.

Under each resource tagged in Diigo and brought in here is a brief description and a link below for course participants to add comments about the resource regarding uses in art education, problems encountered, or offer solutions and tips.

Web Editing

There are many free or open source web editing programs for use in your art teaching.

Concept Mapping

 

FAQs

Table of Contents for FAQ.

Scroll down for responses or click on question to more information.

Costs

Requirements

Time Frame

Technology Requirements

Penn State Policies

Learning at a Distance



Costs

What does this program cost?

Costs to enroll in online MPS Art Education courses include charges for tuition and an information technology fee payable each semester. Most readings, course content, and technology will be linked and embedded resources within the courses. Some MPS Art Education courses will require that you purchase textbooks and related instructional materials. These items are not included in tuition, but must be purchased separately.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

separately.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because this is a World Campus program, students are charged at the base tuition no matter where they live. There is no out-of-state tuition charge.

 

Courses for the MPS in Art Education program offered through The World Campus per credit tuition is $644 (644 x 3-credits = $1,932). If just taking one three-credit course enrollees will also be assessed a $75 Information Technology Fee; if enrollment is between 5 and 9 credits, the technology fee is $164. Non-degree students must pay a $30 application fee if they are not already enrolled at Penn State. In applying to the MPS program there is a degree application fee as well.

 

Some school districts reimburse graduate classes at a rate of $300 per credit hour, up to 12 credits per calendar year. This reimbursement typically happens after an "A" grade is earned. Most school districts have a form that must be filled out and approved prior to enrolling in the course. The teacher typically pays the tuition out of pocket and is reimbursed at the end of the semester upon earning an "A" grade. Act 48 credits are slightly different. Graduate credits suffice for the requirements of the PA Professional II certificate and they count toward salary advancement. Act 48 credits do not count toward salary advancement.

 

Penn State art education doctoral student, Elizabeth Andrews, describes that she has received a TAP grant to support rural art educators in Pennsylvania, and she is supportive to allocate from this TAP grant for funding to art teachers in PA. The grant funding is intended to spend on teacher / administrator / artist professional development. If you would like information on the TAP grant intended to support PA teacher / administrator / artist professional development please contact Elizabeth Andrews at <eja149@psu.edu>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Can I get financial aid?

Financial aid eligibility for World Campus degree students is possible within stringent parameters. For more information, contact a World Campus adviser at 800-252-3592 (814-865-5403 for local and international calls) or visit the Office of Student Aid.

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I need a receipt for reimbursement. How can I get one?

Contact the staff at the World Campus, provide identification, and request that a receipt be sent to you.

Penn State World Campus
128 Outreach Building
University Park PA 16802
Phone: 800-252-3592 (814-865-5403 local and international)
Fax: 814-865-3290
E-mail: psuwd@psu.edu

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Are additional materials required for completing each course? If so, how can I obtain them?

Readings, course content, and technology will be linked and embedded resources within most courses. Some courses may require that you purchase textbooks and related instructional materials. These items are not included in the tuition but must be purchased separately from MBS Direct, an online bookstore located in Columbia, Missouri. Textbooks may be available from other vendors as well, but if you purchase your materials from a source other than MBS Direct, please make sure prior to your purchase that you are obtaining the exact edition and ISBN number of the text required for successful course completion.

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Requirements

What are the academic requirements for completing this program?

The Graduate School of the Pennsylvania State University requires a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 for work done at the University for graduation and to maintain good academic standing. Accordingly, in order to earn a Master of Professional Studies (MPS) in Art Education, students are required to have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 and have completed 30 credits.

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Time Frame

How long will it take me to complete the degree?

The speed at which you complete the master's degree is dependent upon the number of courses you take each semester, but limited by the number of courses offered each semester. The MPS Art Education degree can be completed in three years. If you choose to study at an accelerated pace, taking additional courses during the summer term, you can complete the program in two years with prior advisement from a MPS program faculty member.

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Is there a time limit for completing this program?

All requirements for a master's degree (including acceptance of a professional paper or research project report) must be met within eight years of admission to degree status. Moreover, students are expected at all times to make satisfactory academic progress (i.e. maintaining an overall 3.0 GPA and passing grades in each course) towards meeting degree or certificate requirements.

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Technology Requirements

Can I submit my assignments electronically?

Yes, in fact, electronic submission or posting of responses to assignments is required. The built-in discussion forums and e-mail systems in the courses allow you to attach electronic files.

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Does this program require Internet access?

Yes, this program requires Internet access for activities, assignments, and communication tools. The course content in the program is available in PDF format on each course Web site as well, so you have the option of printing the content.

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I may need help using the Internet to access my online course materials. How can I learn more?

The World Campus has provided you with 2 great resources—training in the form of the free course "World Campus 101" and technical support via the World Campus HelpDesk, a resource available by phone (800-252-3592, option 4, 814-865-0047 for local or international calls), e-mail, or real-time chat.

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Penn State Policies

What is accreditation, and why is it important?

Accreditation is a national system of monitoring the quality of credits you receive from an institution of higher education. Because Penn State is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, our courses are accepted for transfer by most other colleges and universities. If you are enrolled in a specific program at another institution and you are hoping to transfer one of our courses into it, you should check first with the other institution to make sure that the credits will transfer.

In addition, the Master in Professional Studies in Art Education is situated in the School of Visual Arts, which is accredited by the National Association of Art & Design (NASAD). The Penn State Art Education program is also accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Your education will be recognizable and highly regarded anywhere in the nation.

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Can I receive a waiver for a course if I've taken a similar course elsewhere?

Based on evidence of successful completion and earned credits at other academic institutions, certain program electives may be waived with prior approval by a departmental advisor. If an elective course is waived with advanced departmental advisor approval, an appropriate Penn State elective course will be substituted.

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Can I receive credit for life experience?

No. However please note that participation in the MPS in Art Education program, which is intended for location-bound adult professional art educators working at various sites throughout the world, sharing of life experiences will contribute to the overall learning community of art educators participating within the MPS program.

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Learning at a Distance

How will learning at a distance be different from taking courses on campus?

While it is true that your distance education courses will take place in a different kind of environment than that of a typical face-to-face course, in many ways your courses will be similar to on-campus instruction, with an instructor, other students, and course materials. But the courses themselves allow more flexibility than face-to-face classes.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

{C}{C}{C} {C}{C}{C}

Three study habits will maximize your success in your online class:

  1. Devote sufficient time and effort. Schedule several blocks of time during each week to work on project assignments, and to read and contribute to discussions.
  2. Communicate effectively. Post succinct, specific questions and comments with informative subject lines. Whenever appropriate, share questions and comments with the entire class (through text commenting or discussion forums) rather than using private email. Read others’ questions and comments and replies.
  3. Approach learning reflectively.

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How will I interact with my instructor and other students?

You will be part of a group of students in each course in this program, with all students starting and ending each course at the same time. At Penn State World Campus we use a variety of means to bring students and instructors together, including:
asynchronous electronic threaded discussions on the course Web site
asynchronous bookmarking, annotations and highlighting website text, and post-it note commentary on websites
synchronous sessions (chat, NetMeeting, avatars in virtual world field trips)
e-mail

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How quickly should I expect responses from my instructor?

When you take a course in a traditional, face-to-face classroom, you can ask a question of your professor and receive an immediate response. Distance education makes this process a little trickier. Students can still comment, share ideas, and ask questions of their instructors with ease through e-mail, telephone, or other means—but often the responses are not immediate. Instructors are not sitting next to their telephones or computers, waiting for questions to come through. However, they are available on a regular basis and are able to respond to their students in a timely manner.

Similar to face-to-face courses, instructors who teach online will communicate their availability for individual meetings and when to expect responses to your questions and feedback. Each MPS Art Education course has an open-ended discussion board to post questions and comments that instructors check regularly, and is also used to encourage student interaction.

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What if my assignments get lost?

When submitting your assignments electronically you should always keep a copy. If you are preparing assignments on a computer, it is fairly easy to keep an electronic copy on either your hard drive or a portable drive.

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Who may be a proctor for my exams?

Refer to "Taking Exams and Securing a Suitable Proctor." People such as principals, teachers, guidance counselors, and librarians are qualified to administer exams, though you will need to send some specific documentation to the World Campus office to get a proctor approved before your exam will be sent to that person. Mentors are not acceptable proctors for exams. Please note that most courses in the MPS Art Education program do not require proctored exams.

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Will I have access to library resources?

Many of Penn State's library resources can be used from a distance. As a registered University Libraries user, you can use the Web to:
  • search for journal articles (many are even immediately available in full-text)
  • request articles that aren't available in full-text and have them delivered electronically
  • borrow books and other materials and have them delivered to your doorstep
  • access materials that your instructor has put on Electronic Reserve
  • talk to reference librarians in real time using chat, phone, and e-mail

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Will these courses appear as correspondence courses on my transcript?

No distinction will be made on your official Penn State transcript that your courses were completed at a distance. The credits you receive are exactly the same as those awarded to on-campus students. Penn State values distance education as highly as it does resident instruction.

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Can I drop a course once I've begun?

Yes, it is possible to drop a course. Procedures vary slightly, depending on your student status and the course time frame. All partner-sponsored students must communicate their desire to drop a course to both their institutional contact and Penn State. For specific procedures regarding dropping a course, see the student policies page.

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Request Information

Apply Now

To apply to this program as a degree student, you must complete the graduate school application.

Applying to the Master's Degree

  1. Read the admissions page carefully, as each program has unique requirements.
  2. Begin the graduate school application.
    1. On the "Campus, Major, Degree & Semester" page:
      1. Choose "WORLD CAMPUS" as the campus.
      2. Choose "ART EDUCATION" as the major.

Check Status

Use these options for applications already in progress or to check the status of an application previously submitted.